Global University: Dual/Joint Degree Working Group

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University of Wisconsin – Madison

Guidelines for double and joint degree programs between universities in Japan and universities in foreign countries

Hi everyone…a Japanese Ministry viewpoint here:

Guidelines for Building Organized and Continuous Cooperation Including Double and Joint Degree Programs between university in Japan And university in foreign countries (May 2010)

Best,

Kris

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Filed under: Kris Olds, Resources

UVIC Guidelines

Here is a newish guidelines document from the University of Victoria (UVIC) in British Columbia about

  • Double degrees
  • Conjoint (joint) programme
  • Dual registration
  • Co-supervision

with some further information and links to sample dual degree etc., programs.

Kris

Filed under: Kris Olds, Resources

College Guidance on Joint Awards

This just arrived, FYI…

College Guidance on Joint Awards

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Diversifying University Studies: Joint Degrees as a New Model of Academic Mobility

Hi there…

Some people in Graz just sent this on to me:

Joint Degrees as New Model

The source is:

http://www.bologna-handbook.com/

Best,

Kris

Filed under: Kris Olds, Resources

Joint programs and degrees – the IAU view

Eva Egron-Polak (Secretary General, International Association of Universities) informs me that:

[I]n the IAU 3rd Global Survey on Internationalization we asked respondents questions about double and joint degrees.  We decided to keep it as simple as possible and used the following definitions:

  • Joint Degree Programme – A joint degree programme is developed collaboratively by two or more partner HEIs, and graduates are awarded one joint qualification
  • Dual/double degree programme – A dual/double degree programme is developed collaboratively by two or more partner HEIs, and graduates are awarded two qualifications at equivalent level

We translated the questionnaire and definitions into 5 languages so it needed to be simple and clearly understood by all.

The latter point, about the importance of clarity and mutual understanding, is obviously a key one to take into account.

Also see a 2009 presentation by Eva on this topic.  Cheers,  Kris

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Governance pathways for shared-credential proposals at the University of Alberta

Please see the image below, as well as an attached explanatory note.  This was kindly sent to us by Mazi Shirvani (Professor of Mathematics, Vice-Provost and Dean, Faculty of Graduate Studies and Research, University of Alberta).  Kris

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The latest National University of Singapore definitions + templates of scrolls

See below, and link here for a copy of the joint degree scroll and a single degree scroll templates (both in PDF format).  My thanks to Lily Kong (Vice-President (University & Global Relations), NUS) for the information.

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Sample definitions of JDs/DDs/CDs

Dear colleagues,

Apologies for being so quiet – I’m in the middle of the Hmong Studies faculty search process, which should end in about two weeks.

On definitions, I’d encourage us all to examine Joint and Double Degree Programs: An Emerging Model for Transatlantic Exchange) by the International Institute for Education (IIE) and the Freie Universität Berlin. In it they state, on page xvi:

A joint degree program: students study at (at least) two higher education institutions and receive upon completion of the study program a single degree certificate issued and signed by all the participating institutions jointly.

A dual or double degree program: students study at (at least) two higher education institutions and receive upon completion of the study program a separate degree certificate from each of the participating institutions.

At the National University of Singapore, a few years ago, they used these definitions (I compiled some of these on the basis of notes so please don’t assume they are 100% airtight):

Joint Degree Programs: 1. Joint degree programs (JDPs) are specially designed programs that make the best complementary use of expertise in partner universities.  Students are awarded with one degree (that is, one graduating certificate, with two university crests on it).  They may be at the undergraduate or graduate level. 2.The joint degree will take the same length of time as a single degree, and for an undergraduate degree, the student will usually spend three or four of eight semesters overseas.

More recently they defined Joint Degree Programs this way:

JDP combines the strengths of both NUS and the partner university, and integrates international experience fully into a student’s course of study and research. Students will be jointly taught, supervised, assessed and jointly awarded a degree. The degree scroll bearing the crests and official signatories of both universities will be a doubly validated qualification.

Again, on the basis of my notes from a few years ago:

Double Degree Programs: 1. Double degree programs (DDPs) are specially designed programs that also make the best complementary use of expertise in partner institutions and may be at undergraduate or graduate level.  Students are awarded with two degrees, but would generally take less time and fulfil less requirements than if the student were to take the two degrees separately (i.e. not as part of a DDP).  However, they would take more time than that required for a single degree.  Usually, what would take six to eight years would take five to five-and-a-half years with a DDP arrangement. 2. It is envisaged that students will spend about half of their five to five-and-a-half-year candidature on each campus.

More recently they noted:

Double degree coursework programmes normally allow some modules taken to be double counted towards the requirements of both degrees, thus allowing the student to complete the two degrees in a shorter period of time than it would take to complete both degrees separately.

At the undergraduate level, the National University of Singapore currently defines Concurrent Degree Programmes (CDPs) this way:

CDPs involve a combination of a Bachelor’s and a Master’s degree from the same Faculty/School or from two different Faculties/Schools and allow a student to pursue a Bachelor’s and a Master’s degree concurrently. The programme structure allows some of the requirements for the Bachelor’s degree to be double counted towards the Master’s degree so that a student could graduate in four and a half to five years with both degrees, something which would normally take between five and a half and six years if pursued separately.

This type of degree can be ‘international’, even within one campus: for example see their Bachelor of Laws from NUS and Master of Laws from New York University where “NUS Law students may apply for admission to the NYU LLM in their second or exceptionally in their third year of studies” though the admission decision is made by NYU. In this case NYU has a base at NUS , and they collaborate closely together in the field of law.

There are a number of other definitions, of course, and ways to deepen our understanding of each.  For example, Pascal Deslile (in Joint and Double Degree Programs: An Emerging Model for Transatlantic Exchange) talks about “research-drive double degrees” and “professional education double degrees”.

Or see this graphic from a report (Joint and Double Degree Programmes: Vexing Questions and Issues), by Jane Knight and the OBHE:

I’ve sent out a call to some colleagues working with such degrees and programs for their most up-to-date & lucid definitions…keep you posted.

Kris

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Resources for Context

A few recent reports with broad contextual relevance re: collaboration in research and teaching:

New MIT report (Dec 2009) includes examination of the role of internationalization in revenue enhancement (PDF): http://bit.ly/4NgDj1

2010 Horizon Report spotlights six key emerging technologies:  http://tinyurl.com/horizonreport

Kris

[NB: These sources are also available as a link on the blog’s homepage.]

Filed under: Kris Olds, Resources

Video: London School of Economics – Sciences Po Collaborations

Here is a video clip worth loading up re LSE-Sciences Po collaborations, including an explanation of the pros of their collaborative degrees:

http://www.sciences-po.fr/portail/fr-fr/actualites/annee-en-cours.html?id=381

Cheers

kris

[NB: this video is also available as a link on the blog’s homepage]

Filed under: Kris Olds, Resources